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Intersections of Race, Gender and Social Policy in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Waihi I te toipoto, kaua I te toiroa

  • Tracey McIntosh

Abstract

Identity, both personal and collective, is formed in the material reality in which we live. Our gendered identities determine to a large degree the way that we see ourselves and are seen. Similarly, our class location is important to these same perceptions. Ethnicity is another layer, and some ethnic identities produce a far greater and more pronounced reaction than others. The Maori experience of colonization and the contemporary reality of marginalization and deprivation in everyday life mean that ethnic identity in Aotearoa/New Zealand is a site of struggle and resistance.2 There is no single Maori experience. We do not all suffer the same burdens or enjoy the same privileges. Though there is a strong sense of our connectedness, of our belonging to each other by descent, by land and by sharing a common history, our experience of being Maori is inflected in myriad ways. If we understand social policy to be those ‘actions which affect the well-being of members of society through shaping the distribution of and access to goods and resources in that society’ and note that by this process ‘some groups and individuals will be advantaged and others disadvantaged’ (Cheyne et al., 1999: 2–3), we understand how social policy influences and moulds these experiences.

Keywords

Social Policy Ethnic Identity Indigenous Woman Feminist Issue Ethnic Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© UNRISD 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tracey McIntosh

There are no affiliations available

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