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Introduction: Racism, Citizenship and Social Justice

  • Yusuf Bangura
  • Rodolfo Stavenhagen

Abstract

At the beginning of the twentieth century, W. E. B. du Bois, the pre-eminent intellectual of the African-American people, foretold that it would be the century of the ‘color line’. During the decades that followed, the world witnessed the rise and fall of Nazism, the Holocaust, the civil rights movement in the United States, the end of colonialism and apartheid, the emergence of indigenous peoples as political actors on the international scene, the renewal of racism in Europe and the horrendous spectacle of ethnic cleaning and genocide in Bosnia and Rwanda. A century on, the ‘color line’ is still with us, separating peoples and cultures, dividing the powerful from the downtrodden. Even as it binds some together in tight ethnic communities, it ties up many others in conceptual knots.

Keywords

Indigenous People Racial Discrimination Indigenous Community Race Relation Institutionalize Racism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© UNRISD 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yusuf Bangura
  • Rodolfo Stavenhagen

There are no affiliations available

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