Nobody’s Children: Orphans and their Ancestors in Popular Scottish Fiction after 1945

  • Alan Riach

Abstract

The first stanza of the last canto of Byron’s Don Juan was written in 1823, in Genoa, and was followed by fourteen more, the last one scored out. Byron took them with him to Greece, but wrote no more. He died in April 1824. These, then, are poignant fragments: close to the last things the bad Lord ever wrote. The pathos is unavoidable. Byron continues: ‘if examined, it might be admitted / The wealthiest orphans are more to be pitied. // Too soon they are parents to themselves’.1

Keywords

Vortex Dust Nicotine Beach Smoke 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Alan Riach 2005

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  • Alan Riach

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