Globalization and “Mad” Technology

  • Ingyu Oh
  • Hun-Joon Park
  • Shigemi Yoneyama
  • Hyuk-Rae Kim

Abstract

Globalization and mad technologies have coexisted throughout human history (Braudel, 1992, 1993; Gerschenkron, 2000; Heilbroner, 1989; Mumford, 1963, 1964; Schumpeter, 1947, 1961; Shattuck, 1996; Wallerstein, 1979). The discovery of crude oil and the invention of gunpowder by the Mongolian army enabled them to conquer most of the Eurasian continent in the course of the twelfth century (Curtin and Roosevelt, 2003). In a similar vein, the invention of pistols and other firearms by Western European armies enabled them to successfully undertake long distance wars in Asia, America, and Africa (Ellis and Ezell, 1986; Fuller, 1998; Smith, 2003). In both cases, states and their armies profited from technological innovations. With regard to these innovations in weaponry, we label them “mad,” because it was simply impossible for any civilians to stop these deadly military machines from killing human beings and engaging in long distance wars. What was worse, over a long period of time, states and their armies could no longer control the unchecked proliferation of firearms throughout the world.

Keywords

Defend 

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Copyright information

© Ingyu Oh, Hun-Joon Park, Shigemi Yoneyama and Hyuk-Rae Kim 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ingyu Oh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hun-Joon Park
    • 3
  • Shigemi Yoneyama
    • 4
    • 5
  • Hyuk-Rae Kim
    • 3
  1. 1.JumonjibaruJapan
  2. 2.AucklandNew Zealand
  3. 3.SeoulKorea
  4. 4.TokyoJapan
  5. 5.ParisFrance

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