International Mobility of Human Resources of Science and Technology and its Complementarity to Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Development in Asia

  • Vincent F. Yip

Abstract

Migration of the first homo sapiens out of Africa, the biblical exodus depicted in Moses and his people, and the post-Second World War migration waves from developing to developed countries are all examples of the high mobility of humans that has existed since the dawn of time. One of the key reasons for human migration was economic — to leave poverty and seek a better life elsewhere: the migrants typically never return to their ancestral homes and the movement was always one-way. With the greater ease in communications and transportation in the second part of the twentieth century, especially after the popularization of civilian air travel in the 1960s, migration and the associated socio-economic effects for both the sending and host countries become increasingly interconnected.

Keywords

Migration Mercury Europe Petroleum Transportation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Addison, T. and Heshmati, A., ‘The New Global Determinants of FDI Flows to Developing Countries’, UNU/WIDER Conference on the New Economy in Development, 10–11 May 2003, Helsinki.Google Scholar
  2. Cervantes, M. and Guellec, D., ‘The Brain Drain: Old Myths, New Realities’, OECD Observer, 7 May 2002.Google Scholar
  3. Efendioglu, A. and Yip, V., 2003, ‘Technology and Culture: E-Commerce in China’, Chapter in H.S. Kehal and V.P. Singh (eds), The Digital Economy: Impact, Influences, and Challenges, New York, Idea Group Publishing.Google Scholar
  4. Gayathri, V., ‘Rethinking High-Skilled International Migration: Research and Policy Issues for India’s Information Economy’, OECD Proceedings of the Paris Conference on International Mobility of the Highly Skilled, Paris, OECD, 2001, 208–10.Google Scholar
  5. —— ‘International Mobility of Highly Skilled Workers: From Statistical Analysis to Policy Formulation’, OECD Proceedings of the Paris Conference on International Mobility of the Highly Skilled, Paris, OECD, 2001, 71–98.Google Scholar
  6. Guellec, D. and Cervantes, M. ‘International Mobility of Highly Skilled Workers: From Statistical Analysis to Policy Formulation’, OECD Proceedings of the Paris Conference on International Mobility of the Highly Skilled, Paris, OECD, 2002.Google Scholar
  7. Kapur, D., ‘Diasporas and Technology Transfer’, Journal of Human Development, 2(2), 2002, 265–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Kapur, D. and McHale, J., ‘Sojourns and Software: Internationally Mobile Human Capital and High-Tech Industry Development in India, Ireland, and Israel’, in A. Arora and A. Gambardella (eds), Software in Emerging Nations, 2003.Google Scholar
  9. Kotkin, J., ‘Tribes — How Race, Religion, and Identity Determine Success in the New Global Economy’, New York, Random House, 1993, 99–101.Google Scholar
  10. Mallampally P. and Sauvant, K.P., ‘Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries’, Finance & Development, 36(1), 1999.Google Scholar
  11. Nayyar, D., ‘Migration, Remittances and Capital Flows: The Indian Experience’, New Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1994.Google Scholar
  12. Noorbakahsh, F., Poloni, A. and Youssef, A., ‘Human Capital and FDI Inflows to Developing Countries: New Empirical Evidence’, World Development, 29(9), 2001, 1593–1610.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Pan, L. (ed.), The Encyclopedia of the Chinese Overseas Chinese, Washington, DC, American Association for the Achievement of Science, 1998.Google Scholar
  14. Papademetriou, D. and Martin, P. ‘Migration and Development: A Review of the Evidence’, in D. Papademetriou and P. Martin (eds), Migration and Development: The Unsettled Relationship, Greenwood Press, 1991, 1213–14.Google Scholar
  15. Saggi, K., ‘Trade, Foreign Direct Investment, and International Technology Transfer: A Survey’, Background Paper for the World Bank ‘Microfoundations of International Technology Diffusion’ Research Project, 2003.Google Scholar
  16. Saxenian, A., Silicon Valley’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Public Policy Institute of California, San Francisco, California, 1999.Google Scholar
  17. —— ‘Local and Global Networks of Immigrant Professionals in Silicon Valley’, report published in 2002 by the Public Policy Institute of California, San Francisco, California, 2002.Google Scholar
  18. Stephan, P.E. and Levin, S.G., ‘Exceptional Contributions to US Science by the Foreign-Born and Foreign-Educated’, Science, 285(5431), 1999.Google Scholar
  19. Su, J.C., ‘The Return of Overseas Professionals and Its Impact on the Technology Acquisition of Hi-tech Industries in the Hsinchu Science Industrial Park’, unpublished thesis, National Central University, Taiwan, 1995.Google Scholar
  20. Tremblay, K., ‘Student Mobility Between and Towards OECD Countries: A Comparative Analysis’, International Mobility of the Highly Skilled, Paris, OECD, 2003.Google Scholar
  21. UNCTAD, World Investment Report, 1998.Google Scholar
  22. —— World Investment Report, 2003.Google Scholar
  23. Wong, Poh-Kam and Chee-Yuen Ng, ‘Industrial Policy, Innovation and Economic Growth: The Experience of Japan and the Asian NIEs’, Singapore University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
  24. Yip, V., The Talent War in Asia, Taipei Tsaiku Human Resource Publishing Company, 2003, 175–6 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  25. Zhang, G. and Li, W., ‘International Mobility of China’s Resources in Science and Technology and Its Impact’, OECD Proceedings of the Paris Conference on International Mobility of the Highly Skilled, 2001, 189–94.Google Scholar
  26. Zhao, J., ‘Brain Drain and Brain Gain: The Migration of Knowledge Workers from and to Canada’, Education Quarterly Review, 3, 2000, 8–35.Google Scholar
  27. Zweig, D. and Chen, C., China’s Brain Drain to the United States — Views of Overseas Chinese Students and Scholars in the 1990s, Berkeley, CA, The Institute of East Asian Studies, 1995.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent F. Yip

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations