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Autonomization and Policy Capacity: The Dilemmas and Challenges Facing Political Executives

  • Tom Christensen
  • Per Lœgreid

Abstract

Policy capacity is an elusive and ambiguous concept but generally it has to do with the ability to use resources in a systematic way to make intelligent collective decisions in a democratic political-administrative system based on sufficient understanding, information and authority (Olsen, 1983; see also Chapter 1, this volume). Policy capacity is a collective effort by political and administrative executives and other public leaders and institutions and includes both political and managerial capability. From a democratic point of view elected political leaders are especially important. A central feature of policy capacity in a representative democracy is the political control exercised by political executives and their authority to set strategic directions for obtaining public ends. In this chapter we shall focus on the role of executive politicians in respect of policy capacity and the changes they are experiencing relative to other central actors.

Keywords

Political Leader Public Management Reform Process Winning Coalition Political Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom Christensen
  • Per Lœgreid

There are no affiliations available

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