Policy Capacity and Citizens’ Attitudes: ‘Developmentalism’ in Nine Asian States

  • Ian Marsh

Abstract

In Chapter 1 of this volume Painter and Pierre distinguished between policy capacity and state capacity. The concepts are interdependent, particularly in democratic contexts (see for example Pharr et al, 2000). Elsewhere I have explored the significance of opinion formation in underpinning policy capacity, particularly in relation to economic governance. Attitudes, orientations and behaviours can facilitate social cooperation and programme implementation (Marsh, 1999a). This chapter draws on institutional studies of economic performance that have emphasized the importance of supportive ‘ideas, choice sets and motives’ (North, 1990), particularly for their contribution to cooperative outcomes (for example Smith, 2004; West, 2004).

Keywords

Economic Crisis Europe Income Malaysia Boulder 

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© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005

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  • Ian Marsh

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