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Has Socialism Contributed to Gender Role Changes? A Comparison of Gender Roles in Cuba and Japan

  • Kanako Yamaoka
Part of the IDE-JETRO Series book series (IDE)

Abstract

Gender issues in socialist countries have been discussed by many scholars. Most of them acknowledge that socialism succeeded in sending women to work outside their homes, while the domestic burden was not lifted from their shoulders, even when they had jobs. Therefore, women have dual responsibilities, both at work and at home. This is also true in the Cuban case. In spite of the progressive Family Code of 1975, which provides for husbands and wives sharing domestic work and child care, there have been few couples who honour this provision. Cuban machismo is still fully alive under the socialist regime.

Keywords

Child Care Gender Role Statistics Bureau Female Worker Domestic Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Institute of Developing Economies (IDE),JETRO 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kanako Yamaoka

There are no affiliations available

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