The Mining Sector in Congo: The Victim or the Orphan of Globalization?

  • Erik Kennes

Abstract

Among the many demobilizing myths circulating in the DRCongo is that of the country’s immense natural wealth coveted by the entire world and inspiring a Big Conspiracy by American multinational companies to take over the country. Globalization has certainly created ample room for them to realize their project, as became obvious during the march of the AFDL in 1996–97 aimed at toppling President Mobutu’s regime. A closer look at these events reveals that the relationship between the Congo and the world of international mining (and politics) cannot be understood within a simplistic conspiracy theory. The DRC has, in a sense, derailed during an operation that should have adjusted its economy to world trends — be it for the better or for the worse.

Keywords

Petroleum Uranium Income Explosive Flare 

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Notes

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© Erik Kennes 2005

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  • Erik Kennes

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