The Politics of Welfare Developmentalism in Hong Kong

  • Eliza W. Y. Lee
Part of the Social Policy in a Development Context book series (SPDC)

Abstract

As an Asian late industrializer, Hong Kong has shared many common characteristics with its counterparts in their welfare system, such as low government spending on welfare, emphasis on self-reliance and the family as informal carers, ideological rejection of welfare as a matter of social right and the primacy given to economic development. The inadequacy of the Asian welfare model was obscured by sustained economic growth, which provided for full employment and rising real wages. In recent years, Asian welfare regimes have confronted a similar set of pressures arising from demographic changes and rising social expectations, with the Asian Financial Crisis representing an unprecedented challenge to their adequacy. In this chapter, I shall examine the development of Hong Kong’s welfare regime after the Asian Financial Crisis, in the light of how the historical path of development, economic globalization and the state of political development have combined to structure the response of the state toward the pressure on its welfare regime.

Keywords

Economic Crisis Income Social Stratification Arena Defend 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Castells, M. D. (1992). Four Asian Tigers with a Dragon Head: A Comparative Analysis of the State, Economy, and Society in the Asian Pacific Rim, in R. P. Appelbaum and J. Henderson (eds), States and Development in the Asian Pacific Rim, Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  2. Census and Statistics Department (2002). Quarterly Report on General Household Survey, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  3. Chau, L. C. (1994). ‘Economic Growth and Income Distribution in Hong Kong’. In Benjamin K. P. Leung and Teresa Y. C. Wong (eds), Twenty-five Years of Social and Economic Development in Hong Kong. Occasional Papers and Monographs, No. 111, Centre of Asian Studies. Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  4. Chief Executive’s Commission on Innovation and Technology (1999). The Commission’s Second and Final Report to the Chief Executive, Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  5. Chiu, S. W. K. (1994). The Politics of Laissez-Faire: Hong Kong’s Strategy of Industrialization in Historical Perspective, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  6. Chiu, S. W. K. and Levin, D. A. (2000). Contestatory Unionism: Trade Unions in the Private Sector, in S. W. K. Chiu and T. L. Lui (eds), The Dynamics of Social Movement in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Chow, N. W. S. (1998). The Making of Social Policy in Hong Kong: Social Welfare Development in the 1980s and 1990s, in R. Goodman, G. White and H. J. Kwon (eds), The East Asian Welfare Model; Welfare Orientalism and the State, London: Routledge, 159–74.Google Scholar
  8. Education and Manpower Bureau (2000). 1999-Based Manpower Requirement Projection by Education Attainment October 2000, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  9. Education Commission (2000). Learning for Life, Learning through Life: Reform Proposals for the Education System in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  10. Goodman, R., White, G. and Kwon, H. J. (eds) (1998). The East Asian Welfare Model: Welfare Orientalism and the State, London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  11. Harvard Team (1999). Improving Hong Kong’s Health Care System: Why and for Whom?, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  12. Health and Welfare Bureau (2001). Lifelong Investment in Health — Consultation Document on Health Care Reform, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  13. Hong Kong Government (1962). Hong Kong Hansard, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  14. — (1968). Hong Kong Hansard, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  15. — (1977). Hong Kong Hansard, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  16. — (1997). Address by the Chief Executive The Honourable Tung Chee Hwa at the Pro-visional Legislative Council meeting on 8 October 1997, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  17. — (1999). Address by the Chief Executive The Honourable Tung Chee Hwa at the Legislative Council Meeting on 6 October 1999, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  18. — (2002). The 2002–03 Budget. Speech by the Financial Secretary, The Honourable Antony Leung Moving the Second Reading of the Appropriation Bill 2002, Wednesday, 6 March 2002, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  19. Housing Planning and Lands Bureau (2002). A Statement on Housing Policy, Hon. Michael M. Y. Suen, GBS, JP Secretary for Housing, Planning and Lands.Google Scholar
  20. Jones, C. (1990). Promoting Prosperity: The Hong Kong Way of Social Policy, Hong Kong: Chinese University of Hong Kong Press.Google Scholar
  21. Kwon, H. J. (2002). Advocacy Coalitions and the Politics of Welfare in Korea after the Economic Crisis, Policy & Politics, 31, 69–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Lau, S.-K. and Kuan, H. C. (1991). The Ethos of the Hong Kong Chinese, Hong Kong: Chinese University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Lee, E. W. Y. (2002). The Changing Relationship between the State and the Voluntary Sector, Paper presented at the American Society for Public Administration’s 63rd National Conference. Arizona.Google Scholar
  24. — (2003). Gender and Change in Hong Kong: Globalization, Postcolonialism, and Chinese Patriarchy, Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.Google Scholar
  25. Leman, C. (1977). Patterns of Policy Development, Public Policy, 25, 261–91.Google Scholar
  26. Liu, P. (1998). The Asian Financial Crisis and After: Problems and Challenges for the Hong Kong Economy, Occasional Paper, 89, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  27. Ma, N. (2002). Changing Political Cleavages in Post-1997 Hong Kong: A Study of the Changes through the Electoral Arena, in M. K. Chan and A. So (eds), Crisis and Transformation in China’s Hong Kong, Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe.Google Scholar
  28. Minns, J. (2001). Of Miracles and Models: The Rise and Decline of the Developmental State in South Korea, Third World Quarterly, 22, 1025–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Pierson, P. (2001). Coping with Permanent Austerity: Welfare State Restructuring in Affluent Democracies, in P. Pierson (ed.), The New Politics of the Welfare State, Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Sassen, S. (1998). Globalization and Its Discontents: Essays on the New Mobility of People and Money, New York: The New Press.Google Scholar
  31. So, A. Y. (1999). Hong Kong’s Embattled Democracy: A Societal Analysis, Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  32. Social Welfare Department (1998). Support for Self-Reliance: Report on Review of the Comprehensive Social Security Assistance Scheme, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  33. — (2000). Social Welfare Services Lump Sum Grant Manual, Edition 2, Hong Kong: Government Printer.Google Scholar
  34. Tang, K. L. (1998). Colonial State and Social Policy: Social Welfare Development in Hong Kong 1842–1997, Lanham, MD: University Press of America.Google Scholar
  35. Tang, S. H. (1994). The Political Economy of Fiscal Policy in Hong Kong: A Historical Perspective, in B. K. P. Leung and T. Y. C. Wong (eds), 25 Years of Social and Economic Development in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Centre of Asian Studies. Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Tsai, M. C. (2001). Dependency, the State and Class in the Neoliberal Transition of Taiwan, Third World Quarterly, 22, 359–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Tsang, W. (1994a). Behind the Land of Abundant Opportunities, in S-K. Lau, M-K. Lee, P-S. Wan and S-C. Wong (eds), 25 Years of Social and Economic Development in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: Centre of Asian Studies. Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  38. — (1994b). Consolidation of a Class Structure: Changes in the Class Structure of Hong Kong, in L. M. Lau, Siu-Kai, Wan Po-san and Wong Siu-lun (eds), Inequalities and Development: Social Stratification in Chinese Societies, Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  39. Tung, C. H. (1996). Building a 21st Century Hong Kong Together, Hong Kong.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© UNRISD 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eliza W. Y. Lee

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations