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Coming Late — Catching Up: The Formation of a ‘Nordic Model’

  • Olli Kangas
  • Joakim Palme
Part of the Social Policy in a Development Context book series (SPDC)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to provide a historical and comparative framework for the discussion of contemporary social policy developments in the Nordic countries. Present reforms and policy trends illustrate dilemmas for social policy that are common to many countries, and some of the reforms can be seen as alternative strategies to deal with the dilemmas. The relevance of the Scandinavian case for the discussion of different alternative social policy approaches in other parts of the world should be seen in relation to the fact that the Scandinavian model is seen as an ‘ideal type’. Its merits, as well as its drawbacks, deserve to be taken seriously.

Keywords

Social Capital Social Policy Welfare State Nordic Country Pension System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© United Nations Research Institute for Social Development 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olli Kangas
  • Joakim Palme

There are no affiliations available

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