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The ‘General’ Study of Expertise

  • Keith Johnson

Abstract

This chapter considers the ‘general’ study of expertise, in all domains including non-language-related areas. It has two parts. The first considers some of the more influential characterisations of expertise in the literature. The second focuses on research methodology, identifying and discussing methods and issues related to the study of expertise in general. It is hoped that the consideration of general expertise which this chapter provides might suggest approaches and avenues which might be fruitfully taken up in the study of language learning and teaching.

Keywords

Channel Capacity Language Learn Language Teaching Verbal Report High Road 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Keith Johnson 2005

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  • Keith Johnson

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