Abstract

Although it is of course possible to consider language teacher cognition without the focus of attention being on expertise, it is the case that the study of cognition represents an important part of language teacher expertise research. This chapter concentrates on cognition. It is an extract from a review article written by Simon Borg, entitled Teacher cognition in language teaching: a review of research on what language teachers think, know, believe, and do. It appeared in Language Teaching (Vol. 36, 81–109), and is reproduced here with the kind permission of the author and the publisher, Cambridge University Press. The original article is a lengthy and comprehensive survey of work done in the field of language teacher cognition. The section appearing here deals with one central field: cognition and classroom practice, and it includes a particularly relevant sub-section dealing with cognition and experience. The section is prefaced by a discussion taken from an earlier part of Borgs article in which he represents a conceptualisation of teaching indicating the role cognition plays within it. This is shown in his Figure 9.1. In the extract which follows, square brackets — [ ] — enclose small changes in the original wording made by the editor to render the extracted text coherent. When portions of the original text have been omitted, this is signalled thus: […].

Keywords

Beach Sonal Metaphor Weinstein Milton 

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Copyright information

© Simon Borg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Borg

There are no affiliations available

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