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Organizational Survival

  • Robert J. Ballon

Abstract

When the Japanese started full-fledged industrialization in the mid nineteenth century, Japan’s survival was at stake. Safeguarding nationhood meant catching up with the Western powers and being the first non-Western nation to industrialize. It was not so much an action to decide than a reaction to urgent necessity. Thus Western methods were subsumed in the Japanese web of values and practices ‘wakon yôsai’. 1

Keywords

Corporate Governance Small Firm Psychological Contract Joint Stock Company Liberal Democratic Party 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Robert J. Ballon 2005

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  • Robert J. Ballon

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