Meeting the Challenge? Voicing Children and Young People in Mental Health Research

  • Vicki Coppock

Abstract

Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest within the United Kingdom in ‘listening to children’s voices’. A proliferation of research studies has emerged in which children and young people’s views have been sought on various issues affecting their everyday lives (for example, the Economic and Social Research Council’s Children 5–16 Programme). This growth of interest is particularly evident at the level of policy-making, where a range of initiatives has been developed that are premised on improving consultation with, and the participation of, children and young people in the design, delivery and evaluation of services that affect them (Children and Young People’s Unit, 2001; Department of Health, 1998; 2000; 2002). The sheer volume of such initiatives has invited the observation that listening to children’s voices has now become part of the ‘rhetorical orthodoxy’ (Prout, 2003:11). In the context of the longstanding social, political and economic marginalisation of children and young people in the UK (see James and James, chapter 1 in this volume), these developments seem all the more remarkable.

Keywords

Assure Stein Arena Culmination 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vicki Coppock

There are no affiliations available

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