Inside-Out or Outside-In? The Case of Family and Local History

  • Michael Drake

Abstract

Within the walls of academia, practitioners of several aspects of family and local history can be found amongst historians of various hues, geographers, demographers, sociologists. They number in this country a hundred or two. Outside the walls there are tens of thousands, some without any affiliations, but many in family and local history societies and heritage organisations. Between these two sets of researchers there is little overt contact: given the disparity in the numbers this would in any case be unlikely. Many of the former regard the latter as mere collectors of ‘ill-digested fragments of information’ (Marshall 1995: 49), no more worthy of the title ‘researcher’, than stamp collectors or train spotters. As for the latter, there is some resentment and mistrust of the former but mostly there is a widespread ignorance about what they are engaged in.

Keywords

Knowledge Society Local History Family Tree Community History Professional Historian 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Michael Drake 2005

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  • Michael Drake

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