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Conclusion

  • Matthew Cragoe
  • Antony Taylor

Abstract

It is a curiosity of British political history that nineteenth-century London lacks an overall political narrative. The issue of mobilising London was always central to the effectiveness of political groupings that hoped to project a national image. In the nineteenth century, London still represented the political nation to a much greater degree than did the regions. Its centrality made it a major arena of conflict between central and local government, established party politicians and street-level orators, patriots and radicals, and politicians of the centre and the periphery. It has been the aim of this volume to offer some initial forays into this unknown dimension of the capital’s past; in this final chapter, we aim to draw together some lines of this research and suggest directions in which future investigation might profitably be pursued.

Keywords

Political History Royal Palace Initial Foray Political Narrative Religious Accommodation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Matthew Cragoe and Antony Taylor 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew Cragoe
  • Antony Taylor

There are no affiliations available

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