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Introduction

  • Matthew Cragoe
  • Antony Taylor

Abstract

In the last ten years, the history of Victorian London has undergone a renaissance. A generation of scholars has been irresistibly drawn to the underbelly of England’s great, sprawling capital, and brought a flood of illumination to bear on previously unexplored areas of the city’s inner life. Sharing a common insistence that London is intelligible only in terms of new cultural readings of space and geography,1 they offer a picture of the capital focused on its role as a centre of consumption. A giant and insatiable consumer of people as well as goods,2 nineteenth-century London now stands before its public as the ‘City of Dreadful Delight’, repellent yet irresistible. Other, less glamorous, areas of historical enquiry, however, have fared less well. While certain themes have found their chroniclers, notably local government, transport and sanitation reform,3 the political life of nineteenth-century London remains understudied. Though it was home to both parliament and the crown, and centre of a worldwide empire, yet we know very little about the political history of the capital in the nineteenth century.4 The primary aim of this collection is to offer an initial assessment to this missing dimension of metropolitan history.

Keywords

Free Trade Political History Liberal Party Tower Hamlet Cultural Reading 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Matthew Cragoe and Antony Taylor 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew Cragoe
  • Antony Taylor

There are no affiliations available

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