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Practical Anti-fascism? The ‘Aid Spain’ Campaigns in North-East England, 1936–39

  • Lewis H. Mates

Abstract

‘When the fighting broke out on 18 July [1936] it is probable that every anti-Fascist in Europe felt a thrill of hope. For here, at last, apparently, was democracy standing up to Fascism. For years past the so-called democratic countries had been surrendering to Fascism at every step. […] It seemed — possibly it was — the turning of the tide.’1 So wrote George Orwell about the Spanish military revolt, backed by two of Europe’s fascist powers, Italy and Germany, against the Spanish popular front government.2 However, the national leadership of the ‘official’ (i.e. non-communist) British labour movement advocated support for the right-wing National’ government’s policy of non-intervention in Spain. By denying the Republic’s right under international law to buy arms for self-defence, this agreement effectively aided the rebels. Though the labour movement eventually reversed its policy, the national leadership took little positive action in support of the Republic.

Keywords

Labour Movement British Government Labour Party National Leadership Refugee Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lewis H. Mates

There are no affiliations available

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