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The Nigerian Civil War: Causes and the Aftermath

  • Abdul-Ganiyu Garba
  • P. Kassey Garba
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

This chapter addresses three sets of issues: the primary causes of the Nigerian civil war; its duration and the aftermath; and the risk of recurrence. In Section 2 we address the formation of the Nigerian state, focusing on the origins of dominant antithetical forces, struggles and their consequences over four distinct periods leading up to the civil war. Section 3 addresses its duration: why did the war last thirty months, and why did it end when it did? Although Nigeria has not relapsed into civil war, since 1983 peace has become increasingly threatened. In Section 4 we therefore analyse the post-civil war threats and risks. This discussion emphasizes post-conflict governance, nation-building, economic management and development, allowing recommendations to be made to prevent a recurrence of conflict.

Keywords

Civil Society Monetary Policy Niger Delta Colonial Government Colonial State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abdul-Ganiyu Garba
  • P. Kassey Garba

There are no affiliations available

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