Transformation for Post-Conflict Angola

  • Fátima Moura Roque
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

Angola has extensive reserves of oil, diamonds and other minerals, and a burgeoning oil industry. At independence in 1975 it had a well-developed energy, transportation and communications infrastructure. However, the potential for balanced growth has been blighted by civil war, a critical shortage of skills, a centrally-planned economy subordinated to a military agenda, economic mismanagement, endemic corruption, and dependence on oil for foreign exchange and revenue. The country has been impoverished by war. Political interference in economic management resulted in perverse policies, financial sector weakness, opaque public accounts, and corruption. Welfare and personal security declined; Angola lacks qualified public managers and technicians. The public sector is inefficient and a weak private sector is engaged largely in rent-seeking.

Keywords

Sugar Transportation Rubber Income Marketing 

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fátima Moura Roque

There are no affiliations available

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