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Russia’s Reforms: Lessons from the Old Patron

  • Svetlana Vtyurina

Abstract

The collapse of the Soviet Union and the subsequent emergence of modern Russia rank among the most significant historical events of the late twentieth century. Russia’s sudden transition towards a flawed yet recognizable free-market democracy marked an enormous societal transformation which has had vast geopolitical repercussions. Even after the fall of the Soviet state and the break-away of 14 satellite republics, Russia remained the largest country in the world, with an immense territory of 6.5 million square miles, vast natural resources, a population of 143 million, and a central role in international affairs.

Keywords

Exchange Rate Foreign Direct Investment Monetary Policy International Monetary Fund Banking Sector 
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Notes

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Copyright information

© Svetlana Vtyurina 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Svetlana Vtyurina

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