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Illegal Immigration, Human Trafficking and Organized Crime

  • Raimo Väyrynen
Part of the Studies in Development Economics and Policy book series (SDEP)

Abstract

Human migration has been, and still is, intimately connected with the transformations of the world economy. Mass migrations were a common phenomenon in pre-modern world politics, in which they shaped the fates of empires and entire civilizations. Only in a rather late historical phase did the rise of territorial and national states start to impose constraints on migration flows (Koslowski, 2002).

Keywords

Organize Crime International Migration Asylum Seeker Human Trafficking Illegal Immigration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© United Nations University — World Institute for Development Economics Research 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raimo Väyrynen

There are no affiliations available

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