What Fundamentals Drive World Migration?

  • Timothy J. Hatton
  • Jeffrey G. Williamson
Part of the Studies in Development Economics and Policy book series (SDEP)

Abstract

Stories about foreign migrants — legal, illegal and asylum seekers — appear almost daily in the news. Governments in Europe, North America and Australia note these events with alarm and grapple with policy reforms aimed at selecting certain migrants and keeping out others. Economists appear to be well armed to advise the debate since they are responsible for an impressive literature that examines the characteristics of individual immigrants, their absorption and the consequences of their migration on the sending and receiving regions involved. Economists are, however, much less well armed to speak to the determinants of the migration flows that give rise to public alarm.

Keywords

Migration Europe Income Assimilation Beach 

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Copyright information

© United Nations University — World Institute for Development Economics Research 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy J. Hatton
  • Jeffrey G. Williamson

There are no affiliations available

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