Development Cycles, Political Regimes and International Migration: Argentina in the Twentieth Century

  • Andrés Solimano
Part of the Studies in Development Economics and Policy book series (SDEP)

Abstract

International migration is like a barometer of the economic and social conditions in home countries with respect to the rest of the world. Poor economic performance, lack of employment and of wealth-creation opportunities, and little respect for the civil and economic rights of the population prompt the emigration of nationals, while, good economic opportunities, jobs and open policies towards migrants act as a magnet for immigration from abroad.

Keywords

Migration Depression Europe Shipping Income 

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© United Nations University — World Institute for Development Economics Research 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrés Solimano

There are no affiliations available

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