RTAs and South Asia: Options in the Wake of Cancun Fiasco

  • Pradeep S. Mehta
  • Pranav Kumar

Abstract

Ever since the collapse of Cancun Ministerial and the US Trade Representative Robert Zoellick’s reiteration to go for bilateral and regional trade agreements (RTAs) in a subsequent press conference, the debate on multilateralism vs. regionalism got a fresh impetus. It is being widely feared that the collapse of WTO trade talks may shift nations’ focus to bilateral or regional pacts.

Keywords

Europe Income Malaysia Egypt Argentina 

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Copyright information

© Pradeep S. Mehta and Pranav Kumar 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pradeep S. Mehta
  • Pranav Kumar

There are no affiliations available

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