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Asian Crisis and the Future of the Japanese Model

  • Ronald Dore

Abstract

Asia’s ‘version of capitalism … emphasising not markets but government planning and long-term relationships … is now widely regarded as a problem rather than a solution.’1 ‘Gone are all the self-confident claims about the superiority of Asian values.’2 And Asian gloom is matched by American triumphalism. Markets win. Goethe was right. America has it better.

Keywords

Corporate Governance Liberal Democratic Party Japanese Economy Asian Crisis Socialist Party 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Cambridge Political Economy Society 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald Dore

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