Guerrilla Warfare: The Second Phase

  • Leopold Scholtz

Abstract

Although the Syferfontein war plan had failed, the Boers nevertheless still intended to implement it one way or another. After March 1901 there was, however, no opportunity to do so and the Boers had to concentrate on small-scale guerrilla warfare. In May 1901 de Wet wrote to Commandant Kritzinger, who was still in the Cape Colony: ‘Here, [as] in [the] Transvaal skirmishes still regularly occur, although no large battles. Nevertheless the losses of the enemy continue much as earlier. Railways are being destroyed more than ever, as are trains being derailed’.1

Keywords

Fatigue Europe Dispatch Lost Vicin 

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Notes

  1. 4.
    de Wet, De Strijd tusschen Boer en Brit [The Struggle between Boer and Briton], pp. 300–301 (Reitz — Steyn, 10 May 1901).Google Scholar
  2. 21.
    Cf. Leopold Scholtz, ‘Die Slag van Bakenlaagte, 30 Oktober 1901’ [The Battle of Bakenlaagte, 30 October 1901]. (Historia, 19(1), May 1974).Google Scholar
  3. 46.
    Cf. Scholtz, ‘Die Slag van Bakenlaagte’ [The Battle of Bakenlaagte] (Historia, 19(1), May 1974, p. 63).Google Scholar
  4. 54.
    A.P.J. van Rensburg, ‘Die Ekonomiese Herstel van die Afrikaner in die Oranjerivier-Kolonie, 1902–1907’ [The Economic Recovery of the Afrikaner in the Orange River Colony, 1902–1907] (Archives Yearbook for South African History, 1967, II, p. 168).Google Scholar
  5. 101.
    G. Arthur, Life of Lord Kitchener, II, p. 57 (Kitchener — Roberts, 13 December 1901). During January 1902 he thought the war would be over in July. Vide Spies, Methods of Barbarism?, p. 281Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Leopold Scholtz 2005

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  • Leopold Scholtz

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