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The Absence of WMD Stockpiles in Iraq

  • Graham S. Pearson
Part of the Global Issues Series book series (GLOISS)

Abstract

In the run up to the start in March 2003 of the war in Iraq, there appeared, as outlined in Chapter 7, to be little doubt in the United States and the United Kingdom that Iraq possessed stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons. It was made equally clear in both countries after the war that a search was being mounted for these stockpiles. Now, some two years later, there are no signs of any stockpiles of chemical or biological weapons and it is increasingly unlikely that any will be found. In this chapter consideration is given first to the views expressed by UNMOVIC and the ISG and then to an explanation as to why there were no stockpiles.

Keywords

Biological Agent Security Council Nerve Agent Sulphur Mustard Mass Destruction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Graham S. Pearson 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham S. Pearson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BradfordUK

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