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Teleworkers and Telemanagers: IT and Telecommuting in the Digital City

  • Michel S. Laguerre

Abstract

The revolution in IT has transformed the nature of work in the digital city, altering the location of the work site, reshaping the space of the workplace, changing the nature of work time, reconfiguring work practices and office interactions, and complicating the relations between management and workers. It has also globalized work practices. However, only a handful of studies have examined these transformations.1

Keywords

Cell Phone Work Time Female Employee Central Office Male Employee 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Michel S. Laguerre 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel S. Laguerre
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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