Advertisement

Propaganda, ‘Co-ordination’ and ‘Centralisation’: The Goebbels Network in Search of a Total Empire

  • Aristotle A. Kallis

Abstract

One of the most unrelenting orthodoxies in the analysis of interwar fascist regimes concerns the alleged commitment of the fascist leaderships to promote an integral ‘co-ordination’ of the structures of power that they had inherited. Adolf Hitler forced the political establishment of the stillborn Weimar Republic to surrender authority to him and began the process of improvising his NS state. Within three years, the NS leadership had succeeded in appropriating, centralising and establishing an uncontested hegemony over Germany’s political, economic, social and cultural life.1 The existence of a plan behind the legal and political measures, introduced with conspicuous speed by the NS regime immediately after the handing-over of power, was claimed to reflect its ‘revolutionary’ nature2 and its wholesale intention to colonise, transform or appropriate the structures of power on the basis of an integral vision of ‘total’ authority and direction.3 It was precisely the totality of this vision and the disdain for alternatives not sanctioned by NS world view (Weltanschauung) that points to a degree of correlation between intention and political action.

Keywords

National Contour Film Production Film Industry Regional Company Weimar Republic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    K D Bracher, Die nationalsozialistische Machtergreifung (Cologne, 1960)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. M Broszat, The Hitler State: The Foundation and Development of the Third Reich (London: Longman, 1981).Google Scholar
  3. 2.
    R Griffin, The Nature of Fascism (London/New York: Routledge, 1994), 47 ff.Google Scholar
  4. 3.
    H Arendt, The Origins of Totalitarianism (New York: Meridian Books, 1958)Google Scholar
  5. C J Friedrich, ‘The unique character of totalitarian society’, in C J Friedrich (ed.) Totalitarianism (New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1954), 47–60CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. C J Friedrich, Z K Brzezinski, Totalitarian Dictatorship and Autocracy (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1956), 15–26Google Scholar
  7. cf. K D Bracher, Totalitarismus und Faschismus. Eine wissenschaftliche und politische Begriffskontroverse (Munich/Vienna: IZG, 1980).Google Scholar
  8. 4.
    M Mann, ‘The contradictions of continuous revolution’, and H Mommsen, ‘Working towards the “Führer”: reflections on the nature of the Hitler dictatorship’, both in I Kershaw, M Lewin (eds), Stalinism and Nazism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 135–57 and 75–87 respectively CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. A Kallis, ‘ “Fascism”, “parafascism” and “fascistization”: on the similarities of three conceptual categories’, European History Quarterly, 33/2 (2003), 219–49CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Griffin, The Nature of Fascism, 26–55; R Eatwell, ‘Towards a new model of generic fascism’, Journal of Theoretical Politics, 2 (1992), 161–94. On Weber’s theory of ‘ideal-types’CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. see L A Coser, The Sociology of Max Weber (New York: Vintage Books, 1977), 223 ff.Google Scholar
  12. 5.
    See, for example, A Lyttelton, ‘Fascism in Italy: the second wave’, Journal of Contemporary History, 1 (1966), 75–100.Google Scholar
  13. 6.
    D Welch, Propaganda and the German Cinema, 1933–1945 (London/New York: IB Tauris, 2001, rev. ed.), 7–9.Google Scholar
  14. 7.
    Goebbels’s speech is featured in C Belling, Der Film in Staat und Partei (Berlin, 1936), 28–30.Google Scholar
  15. 9.
    I Hoffman, The Triumph of Propaganda — Film and National Socialism 1933–1945 (Providence/Oxford: Berghahn Books, 1996), ch. 4.Google Scholar
  16. 10.
    On the creation of SPIO see M Behn, ‘Gleichschritt in die “neue Zeit”. Filmpolitik zwischen SPIO und NS’, in H-M Bock, M Töteberg (eds), Das Ufa-Buch (Frankfurt: Zweitausendeins, 1992), 341–69.Google Scholar
  17. 11.
    G Albrecht, Nationalsozialistische Filmpolitik. Eine soziologische Untersuchung über die Spielfilme des Dritten Reichs (Stuttgart: Ferdinand Enke, 1969), 12 ff.Google Scholar
  18. 14.
    J Wulf, Theater und Film im Dritten Reich (Gütersloh: Sigbert Mohn Verlag, 1964), 275–6.Google Scholar
  19. 16.
    P M Taylor, Munitions of the Mind. A History of Propaganda from the Ancient World to the Present Era (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003, 3rd ed.), 1–18; Albrecht, Nationalsozialistische Filmpolitik.Google Scholar
  20. 17.
    E Rentschier, The Ministry of Illusion. Nazi Cinema and Its Afterlife (Cambridge, MA/London: Harvard University Press, 1996), 43 ff; K Witte, ‘Film im Nationalsozialismus’, Wolfgang Jacobsen (ed.), Geschichte des deutschen Films (Stuttgart/Weimar: J B Metzler 1993), 119–70; Hoffman, The Triumph of Propaganda, 96 ff.Google Scholar
  21. K Witte, ‘Film im Nationalsozialismus’, Wolfgang Jacobsen (ed.), Geschichte des deutschen Films (Stuttgart/Weimar: J B Metzler 1993), 119–70; Hoffman, The Triumph of Propaganda, 96 ff.Google Scholar
  22. 19.
    For this reading of National Socialism as a ‘neo-feudal’ system of rule see R Koehl, ‘Feudal aspects of National Socialism’, American Political Science Review, Vol. LVI/4 (1960): 921–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 21.
    See, for example, the September 1933 law that banned Jewish artists and writers from the Reich’s cultural production [R Hilberg, The Destruction of the European Jews (London: W H Allen, 1961), 7 ff].Google Scholar
  24. 23.
    Welch, Propaganda and the German Cinema, 23–5; F Moeller, Der Filmminister. Goebbels und der Film im Dritten Reich (Berlin: Henschel Verlag, 1998), ch. 2.Google Scholar
  25. 24.
    See, in general, C Quanz, Der Film als Propagandainstrument Joseph Goebbels (Cologne: Teiresias, 2000).Google Scholar
  26. 25.
    A Kallis, ‘The “regime model” of fascism: a typology’, European History Quarterly, 30/1 (2000), 77–104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 26.
    R Taylor, Film Propaganda: Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany (London/New York: I B Tauris, 1998), 242–8Google Scholar
  28. cf. Albrecht, Nationalsozialistische Filmpolitik, 478–9 (speech to the RFK, February 1941).Google Scholar
  29. 27.
    M S Phillips, ‘The Nazi control of the German film industry’, Journal of European Studies, 1/1 (1971), 37–68CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. G Schoenberner, ‘Ideologie und Propaganda im NS-Film: Von der Eroberung der Studios zur Manipulation ihrer Produkte’, in U Jung (ed.), Der deutsche Film. Aspekte seiner Geschichte von den Anfängen bis zu Gegenwart (Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 1993), 91–110.Google Scholar
  31. 29.
    M Geyer, ‘Restorative elites, German society and the Nazi pursuit of goals’, in R Bessel (ed.), Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany. Comparisons and Contrasts (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), 139–40.Google Scholar
  32. 30.
    In general, see Welch, Propaganda and the German Cinema, 23–7; D Welch, ‘Nazi newsreels in Europe, 1939–1945: the many faces of Ufa’s foreign weekly newsreel (Auslandstonwoche) versus German’s weekly newsreel (Deutsche Wochenschau), Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, 24 (2004), 5–34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. M Töteberg, ‘Unter den Brücken. Kino und Film im Totalen Krieg’, in M Töteberg and H-M Bock (eds), Das UFA-Buch (Frankfurt: Zweitausendeins, 1992), 466–8.Google Scholar
  34. 32.
    On the relation between National Socialism and modernity see G Herf, Reactionary Modernism: Technology, Culture and Politics in Weimar and the Third Reich (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984), chs 2–6; Roberts, The Poverty of Great Politics.Google Scholar
  35. 33.
    O J Hale, The Captive Press in the Third Reich (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1973), 127 ffGoogle Scholar
  36. in general see N Frei, ‘Nationalsozialistische Presse und Propaganda’, in M Broszat und H Möller (eds), Das Dritte Reich. Herrschaftsstruktur und Geschichte (Munich: Beck Verlag, 1986), 152–75.Google Scholar
  37. 34.
    K D Abel, Presselenkung im NS-Staat. Eine Studie zur Geschichte der Publizistik in der nationalsozialistischen Zeit (Berlin: Colloquium Verlag, 1990), 5–10Google Scholar
  38. K Koszyk, Deutsche Presse, 1914–1945, Part III (Berlin: Colloquium, 1972), 387–9.Google Scholar
  39. 35.
    C Larson, ‘The German Press Chamber’, Public Opinion Quarterly, 9 (October 1937), 53–70; Kiefer Alexander, ‘Government control of publishing in Germany’, Political Science Quarterly, 57 (1938): 80–8.Google Scholar
  40. Kiefer Alexander, ‘Government control of publishing in Germany’, Political Science Quarterly, 57 (1938): 80–8.Google Scholar
  41. 36.
    This measure was accompanied by the announcement of the ‘cleansing’ of the profession from ‘Jews’. See W Hagemann, Publizistik im Dritten Reich. Ein Beitrag zur Methode der Massenführung (Hamburg: Hansischer Gildenverlag, 1948), 39; Hale, The Captive Press in the Third Reich, 76 ff; J Wulf, Presse und Funk im Dritten Reich. Eine Dokumentation (Reinbek: Rowohlt, 1966), 137 ff.Google Scholar
  42. Hale, The Captive Press in the Third Reich, 76 ff; J Wulf, Presse und Funk im Dritten Reich. Eine Dokumentation (Reinbek: Rowohlt, 1966), 137 ff.Google Scholar
  43. 37.
    N Frei and J Schmitz, Journalismus im Dritten Reich (Munich: Beck, 1999, 3rd ed.), 22–6.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    F Schmidt, Presse in Fessel. Das Zeitungsmonopol im Dritten Reich (Berlin: Verlag Archiv und Kartei, 1947), 84 ff.Google Scholar
  45. 46.
    Cf. M Mann, Fascists (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004), ch. 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 53.
    Cf. R Rienhardt, ‘Vertraune, Eigenarbeit, Entfaltungsfreiheit’, Zeitungs-Verlag, 9.10.1937, 3.Google Scholar
  47. 56.
    D Kohlmann-Viand, NS-Pressepolitik im Zweiten Weltkrieg. Die ‘Vertraulichen Informationen’ als Mittel der Presselenkung (Munich: Saur, 1991), 199.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. 57.
    W Hagemann, Publizistik im Dritten Reich, 40 ff; P Longerich, ‘Nationalsozialistische Propaganda’, in K D Bracher, M Funke, H-A Jacobsen (eds), Deutschland 1933–1945. Neue Studien zur nationalsozialistischen Herrschaft (Düsseldorf: Droste-Verlag, 1992), 291–314.Google Scholar
  49. 62.
    On the history and evolution of broadcasting in Germany see H-W Stuiber, Medien in Deutschland, Vol. 2: Rundfunk, Part I (Konstanz: UVK-Medien, 1998), 133–83;Google Scholar
  50. K C Führer, ‘Auf dem Weg zur “Massenkultur”. Kino und Rundfunk in der Weimarer Republik’, Historische Zeitschrift 262 (1996), 739–81.Google Scholar
  51. 63.
    I Schneider, Radio-Kultur in der Weimarer Republik. Eine Dokumentation (Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag, 1984)Google Scholar
  52. P Dahl, Radio. Sozialgeschichte des Rundfunks für Sender und Empfänger (Reinbek: Freies Sender Kombinat/AG Radio, 1983).Google Scholar
  53. 64.
    Stuiber, Medien in Deutschland, 51–9; A Diller, Rundfunkpolitik im Dritten Reich, (München: DTV, 1980), 134–42.Google Scholar
  54. 67.
    W Schütte, Regionalität und Föderalismus im Rundfunk. Die geschichtliche Entwicklung in Deutschland 1923–1945 (Frankfurt: 1971), 34–78; Diller, Rundfunkpolitik im Dritten Reich, 112 ff.Google Scholar
  55. 68.
    H J P Bergmeier, R E Lotz, Hitler’s Airwaves: The Inside Story of Nazi Radio Broadcasting and Propaganda Swing (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1997), ch. 1; Diller, Rundfunkpolitik im Dritten Reich, 161–8.Google Scholar
  56. 69.
    H Pohle, Der Rundfunk als Instrument der Politik. Zur Geschichte des deutschen Rundfunks von 1923/38 (Hamburg: Eigenverlag, 1955), 187–9.Google Scholar
  57. 71.
    W Lerg, R Steininger (eds), Rundfunk und Politik 1923–1973. Beiträge zur Rundfunkforschung (Berlin: Spiess, 1975), 161–2.Google Scholar
  58. 72.
    W B Lerg, Rundfunkpolitik in der Weimarer Republik (Munich: DTV, 1980), 460 ff.Google Scholar
  59. 75.
    Stuiber, Medien in Deutschland, 167; K Dussel, Deutsche Rundfunkgeschichte. Eine Einführung (Konstanz: UVK-Medien, 1999), 88 ff; M A Doherty, Nazi Wireless Propaganda: Lord Haw-Haw and British Public Opinion in the Second World War (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000), 4.Google Scholar
  60. M A Doherty, Nazi Wireless Propaganda: Lord Haw-Haw and British Public Opinion in the Second World War (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000), 4.Google Scholar
  61. 78.
    Bergmeier and Lodz, Hitler’s Airwaves, 19; E Kordt, Nicht aus den Akten … (Stuttgart: Union Deutsche Verlagsgesellschaft: 1950), 320 ff.Google Scholar
  62. 80.
    Pohle, Der Rundfunk als Instrument der Politik, 272; K Scheel, Krieg über Ätherwellen. NS-Rundfunk und Monopole 1933–1945 (Berlin: Deutscher Verlag der Wissenschaften, 1970).Google Scholar
  63. 81.
    Stuiber, Medien in Deutschland, 59–65; G Goebel, ‘Der Deutsche Rundfunk …’, Archiv für das Post- und Fernmeldewesen, 6 (1950), 353–53, here 409 ff.Google Scholar
  64. 82.
    M Pater, ‘Rundfunkangebote’, in I Marßolek, A von Saldern (eds), Radio im Nationalsozialismus. Zwischen Lenkung und Ablenkung, Zuhören und Gehörtwerden, Vol. 1 (Tübingen: Diskord, 1998), 129–242.Google Scholar
  65. 83.
    W A Boelcke (ed.), The Secret Conferences of Dr Goebbels. The Nazi Propaganda War, 1939–43 (New York/NY: E P Dutton & Co, 1970), 27.9.1942, 280–1.Google Scholar
  66. 85.
    N Drechsler, ‘Die Funktion der Musik im deutschen Rundfunk 1933–1945’, Musikwissenschaftliche Studien, 1988; Pohle, Der Rundfunk als Instrument der Politik, 329; W Klingler, Nationalsozialistische Rundfunkpolitik 1942–1945. Organisation, Programm und die Hörer (Dissertation: Mannheim, 1983).Google Scholar
  67. Pohle, Der Rundfunk als Instrument der Politik, 329; W Klingler, Nationalsozialistische Rundfunkpolitik 1942–1945. Organisation, Programm und die Hörer (Dissertation: Mannheim, 1983).Google Scholar
  68. 95.
    Scheel, Krieg über Ätherwellen, 316 ff; Wulf, Presse und Funk im Dritten Reich, 315–7 (Rundschreiben 39/39, RKK, 4.11.1939).Google Scholar
  69. 98.
    U von Hehl, Nationalsozialistische Herrschaft (Munich: R Oldenbourg Verlag, 1996), 60–65Google Scholar
  70. cf. K Hildebrand, ‘Nationalsozialismus oder Hitlerismus?’, in M Bosch (ed.), Persönlichkeit und Struktur in der Geschichte (Düsseldorf: Droste, 1977), 55–61Google Scholar
  71. A Kallis, Fascist Ideology. Territory and Expansionism in Italy and Germany, 1919–1945 (London: Routledge, 2000), ch. 3.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Aristotle A. Kallis 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aristotle A. Kallis

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations