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Diplomatic Representation

  • Christer Jönsson
  • Martin Hall
Part of the Studies in Diplomacy and International Relations book series (SID)

Abstract

Textbook writers typically distinguish representation as a core function of diplomacy This is true of general introductions to international politics1 as well as specialized texts on diplomacy.2 Early European writers on diplomacy such as Wicquefort, focused on the representative function, seeing ambassadors first of all as representatives of sovereigns and regarding “the right of embassy” as the foremost mark of sovereignty.3 Students of contemporary diplomacy point to the problematic aspects of representation: “the idea of embodying the state is seen as immodest, false, and dangerous in a democratic and empiricist era replete with memories of the evils which can flow from treating nations as real and states as ends rather than means.”4 Professional diplomats, for their part, experience the dilemma of having at least two personae: their own and that of the state that employs them. “It is a fortunate diplomat who finds the two entirely compatible.”5

Keywords

Foreign Policy Foreign Ministry Representative Democracy Boundary Role Palestine Liberation Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Christer Jönsson and Martin Hall 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christer Jönsson
    • 1
  • Martin Hall
    • 1
  1. 1.Lund UniversitySweden

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