Fluidity in a Dynamic Marketplace

  • Joseph A. DiVanna
  • Jay Rogers
Part of the Corporations in the Global Economy book series (CGE)

Abstract

The dynamic nature of Human Capital often goes unnoticed or at least under-managed because market factors are not readily identified and tracked. Effectively matching talent, process and customer need is often the factor which separates profitable companies from money losing business ventures. If the customer need is routine and predictable, if the process and training is rigorously focused on that need then recruiting sophisticated talent may be counterproductive. However if valued customers present complex and dynamic needs requiring strong diagnosis skills and quick time responses a different equation emerges for entry level skills, training and process.

Keywords

Combustion Migration Europe Marketing Product Line 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 2.
    T. W. Schultz, ‘Investment in Human Capital’, American Economic Review, vol. 51, March 1961, pp. 1–71.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    G. Becker, Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, with Special Reference to Education, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1964.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    J. Naisbitt, Global Paradox: The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful its Smallest Players, London: Nicholas Brealey, 1994, p. 228.Google Scholar
  4. 18.
    R. S. Kaplan and D. P. Norton, The Balanced Scorecard: Translating Strategy into Action, Boston, Mass.: Harvard Business School Press, 1996, pp. 126–46.Google Scholar
  5. 24.
    M. Boon, ‘Human Capital Stock and Productivity: The Case of Dutch Manufacturing Firms’, in P. Buiges (ed.), Competitiveness and the Value on Intangible Assets, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2000, pp. 259–73.Google Scholar
  6. 25.
    Martin Boon, ‘Human Capital Stock and Productivity: The Case of Dutch Manufacturing Firms’, P. Buiges (ed.), Competitiveness and the Value on Intangible Assets, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2000, pp. 266–7.Google Scholar
  7. 31.
    L. Aldisert, Valuing People: How Human Capital Can Be Your Strongest Asset, Chicago, Ill.: Dearborn Trade Publishing, 2002, p. 70.Google Scholar
  8. 33.
    F. E. Best, The Future of Work, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1975, p. 1.Google Scholar
  9. 34.
    A. Godard and V. Lenhart, Transformational Leadership: Shared Dreams to Succeed, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2000, p. 40.Google Scholar
  10. 37.
    P. F. Drucker, Management, New York: Harper & Row, 1974, p. 179.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Joseph A. DiVanna and Jay Rogers 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph A. DiVanna
  • Jay Rogers

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations