Communities, Trust and Organisational Responses to Local Governance Failure

  • Tony Bovaird
  • Elke Loeffler

Abstract

Trust is a key element in all social relationships. In this chapter we look at how the level of trust affects the relationship between citizens, service users and the public sector, understood as both elected politicians and the professional bureaucracies which are engaged to carry out the wishes of dominant political groups.

Keywords

Europe Marketing Nism Stake Fami 

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Copyright information

© Tony Bovaird and Elke Loeffler 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Bovaird
  • Elke Loeffler

There are no affiliations available

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