Capital Account Controls and Liberalization: Lessons for India and China

  • Jonathan Anderson
Chapter
Part of the Procyclicality of Financial Systems in Asia book series (IMF)

Abstract

The extensive literature on capital controls and capital account liberalization in emerging market economies generally identifies two types of capital controls: first, targeted measures aimed at slowing the pace of short-term portfolio inflows and outflows; and second, pervasive restrictions on a broader range of external capital transactions.2

Keywords

Income Malaysia Argentina Volatility Indonesia 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ariyoshi, Akira, Karl Habermeier, Bernard Laurens, Inci ötker-Robe, Jorge Ivan Canales-Kriljenko, and Andrei Kirilenko, 2000, Capital Controls: Country Experiences with Their Use and Liberalization, IMF Occasional Paper No. 190 (Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. CEIC Economic Database, CEIC Data Company Ltd. (Hong Kong).Google Scholar
  3. De Gregorio, José, Sebastian Edwards, and Rodrigo O. Valdés, 2000, “Controls on Capital Inflows: Do They Work?,” NBER Working Paper No. 7645 (Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Edwards, Sebastian, 1998, “Capital Flows, Real Exchange Rates, and Capital Controls: Some Latin American Experiences,” NBER Working Paper No. 6800 (Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Eichengreen, Barry, and Michael Mussa, 1998, Capital Account Liberalization: Theoretical and Practical Aspects, IMF Occasional Paper No. 172 (Washington, DC: International Monetary Fund).Google Scholar
  6. Union Bank of Switzerland (UBS), Zurich.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© International Monetary Fund 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Anderson

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations