Conclusion

  • Andrew Suttie

Abstract

As Swinton had predicted, some people were waiting for Lloyd George’s War Memoirs with ‘guns and clubs’. Many ex-servicemen were outraged by his attacks on Haig.1 Some prominent former senior officers, such as General Maurice, privately and publicly condemned the Memoirs. In a speech at the Albert Hall, Maurice labelled Lloyd George’s denunciation of Haig a ‘dastardly lie’.2 Yet generally, the Memoirs were positively received, and they were praised as an important contribution to the history of the war. For many reviewers, however, the constant attacks on ex-colleagues and the refusal to admit that he himself had any faults or made any mistakes became tedious.

Keywords

Europe Foam Explosive Turkey Trench 

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Notes

  1. 12.
    Captain Liddell Hart, ‘The Candour of Lloyd George’, London Mercury, November 1936, pp. 64–66, LHCMA Liddell Hart MSS 10/1933/156a and b.Google Scholar
  2. 21.
    John Ramsden, Man of the Century: Winston Churchill and his Legend since 1945 (London: HarperCollins, 2002), p. 208. Of course this could be said too of Churchill’s Second World War volumes.Google Scholar
  3. 22.
    Quoted in Brian Bond, The Unquiet Western Front: Britain’s Role in Literature and History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), p. 46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 23.
    Trevor Wilson, ‘A Prime Minister Reflects: The War Memoirs of David Lloyd George’, in John A. Moses and Christopher Pugsley (eds), The German Empire and Britain’s Pacific Dominions 1871–1919: Essays on the Role of Australia and New Zealand in an Age of Imperialism (Claremont, CA: Regina Books, 2000), p. 51.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Andrew Suttie 2005

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  • Andrew Suttie

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