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Science and Technology in India’s Growth

  • Jati Sengupta

Abstract

India has entered the phase of a “new economy” since the late 1990s. This economy is characterized by a number of features, each of which affects growth and development to a significant degree. The major features are as follows:
  1. 1

    increasing role of the information oriented sector utilizing information and communication technology (ICT);

     
  2. 2

    accelerating trends in openness in trade with specialization in technology-intensive exports;

     
  3. 3

    building R&D investment and human capital for the ICT based sectors, and;

     
  4. 4

    proactive policy of government in market enhancing and competitive strategies of domestic firms in domestic and world trade.

     

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Total Factor Productivity Human Development Index Total Factor Productivity Growth Knowledge Capital 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Jati K. Sengupta 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jati Sengupta
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA

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