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Growth Synergy in India: a Challenge

  • Jati Sengupta

Abstract

India, today, is facing a challenge: her history versus her expectations. India’s past history with its regulations and lack of openness in trade has faced the challenge of policy reform. The information technology (IT) sector of today has given India a jolt. It has catapulted the country to a new economy. Economic reforms have set up new expectations: more openness, more liberalization and a new demand for growth like the NICs (newly industrializing countries) in Asia.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Total Factor Productivity Core Competence Indian Company Total Factor Productivity Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Jati K. Sengupta 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jati Sengupta
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA

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