Woman as Text

The Influence of Post-structuralism on Feminist Theory
  • Fionola Meredith

Abstract

‘Woman’ is not some thing, the determinable identity of a figure that appears in the distance, at a distance from other things, and which could be approached or left behind. Perhaps as non-identity, non-figure, simulacrum, she is the abyss of distance, the distancing of distance, the division of spacing, distance itself …1

The way to myself and other women is blocked by [the] male icon as a point of reference, for reverence. And I have to make arguments which sound extravagant to my ears, that women exist.2

Keywords

Dust Manifold Steam Coherence Assimilation 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Fionola Meredith 2005

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  • Fionola Meredith

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