Difference and Undecidability

Post-Saussurean Thought
  • Fionola Meredith

Abstract

There is nowhere anything lasting, neither outside me, nor within me, but only incessant change. I nowhere know of any being, not even my own. There is no being. I myself know nothing and am nothing. There are only images: They are the only thing which exists … I myself am only one of these images: indeed, I am not even this, but only a confused image of images. All reality is transformed into a wondrous dream, without a life which is dreamed about, and without a spirit which dreams; into dream which coheres in a dream of itself.1

Keywords

Coherence Posit Straw Dition Pyramid 

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Notes

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© Fionola Meredith 2005

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  • Fionola Meredith

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