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Dismantling the Organisational Settlement: Towards a New Public Management

  • Ian Kirkpatrick
  • Stephen Ackroyd
  • Richard Walker

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to describe how, from the early 1980s, attempts were made to radically transform the institutions and practices of the post war organisational settlement. We argue that over this period there occurred a ‘break with the interplay between the state and the professions’ (Jepperson et al., 2002: 1564). This process weakened the influence and ‘institutional autonomy’ (Flynn, 1999; Evetts, 2002) of organised professional groups. Added to this, and of central concern to us in this book, were attempts to transform the management arrangements of professional services. According to Exworthy and Halford (1999a: 3–4), the new managerialism represented a ‘strategic weapon with which to curb the powers of overly independent professionals’. Under both Conservative and New Labour governments, a primary goal of policy has been to move away from the custodial pattern of administration described in Chapter 2. The aim was to establish in these services a new and supposedly more effective ‘managerial mode of coordination’.

Keywords

Public Service Professional Group Public Management Housing Association Labour Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ian Kirkpatrick, Stephen Ackroyd and Richard Walker 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Kirkpatrick
  • Stephen Ackroyd
  • Richard Walker

There are no affiliations available

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