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Defining the Enemy: EU and US Threat Perceptions After 9/11

  • Susan E. Penksa

Abstract

What does it mean for a state to be secure? Threats are challenges to the security of a state and to its national interests. Threat perceptions are sets of beliefs about the nature of insecurity and what constitutes an ‘enemy’. To understand how states perceive security threats is to know something about how they define their security environment and what value priorities they project onto that environment. The way in which threat is defined is a major component of the security culture of a state.

Keywords

Security Policy Security Threat Mass Destruction European Security Threat Perception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan E. Penksa

There are no affiliations available

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