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Alzheimer’s Speakers and Two Languages

  • Guenter M. J. Nold

Abstract

The language of people who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been a field of research in medicine and psychology for a long time. A major focus of this research has been to describe specific language-related deficiencies that can help identify people with AD in contrast to people with only slightly different symptoms. The description of deficiencies has been the basis for research that links language-related deficiencies to stages of an on-going process of psychopathological deterioration and ultimately to specific lesions in the brains of AD patients (cf. Cummings, 1992; Cummings et al. 1985; Heindel et al. 1997; Kempler 1991).

Keywords

Verbal Fluency Dominant Language German Word Linguistic Behaviour Bilingual Speaker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Guenter M.J. Nold 2005

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  • Guenter M. J. Nold

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