The New Public Procurement Regime

  • Christopher Bovis

Abstract

The European Union has finally adopted a new set of rules which govern the award of public contracts in the supplies, works and services sectors, as well as in the public utilities1 after a considerable amount of debate and consultation.2 The new Directives reflect on the 1996 Commission’s Green Paper on Public Procurement3 and subsequently the 1998 Commission’s Communication. The Directives have been seen as an integral part of the Commission’s 2000 Work Programme, which pledges to modernise the relevant legislation for the completion of the internal market and at the same time implement the Lisbon European Council’s call for economic reform within the internal market. The new Public Procurement regime will become operational by January 31, 2006, when Member States are expected to transpose the Directives into national law.4 Currently the previous regime is still applicable.5

Keywords

Arena Protec Concession 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    T. Daintith, The Executive Power Today: Bargaining and Economic Control in The Changing Constitution, J. Jowell and D. Oliver (eds), 1985.Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    M.L. Harrison, Corporatism and the Welfare State, 1984.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    M.A. Flamme et P. Flamme, Enfin l’ Europe des Marchés Publics, 1989, p. 653.Google Scholar
  4. 13.
    C. Bovis, The Liberalisation of Public Procurement and its Impact on the Common Market, pp. 4–20.Google Scholar
  5. 14.
    P.J. Birkinshaw, Corporatism and Accountability in Corporatism and the Corporate State, N. O’Sullivan and A. Cox (eds), 1988.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Christopher Bovis 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Bovis

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