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Mongolia: Unpredictable Ownership — Comparing a Japanese and a Swedish Funded Project

  • Lkham Luvsanjamts
  • Marie Söderberg

Abstract

Mongolia is the sixth most aid-dependent country in the world measured as a percentage of gross national income (WB 2003: 160–1), with Japan as the largest bilateral donor. The World Bank, Asia Development Bank, IMF and UNDP all have resident missions in the capital Ulaanbaatar. What is it that enables Mongolia to attract so much aid, even from some of the Nordic countries? The country has a small population of 2.5 million people inhabiting an area four times that of Japan and three times that of Sweden. It has a severe climate, with little precipitation; with its high altitudes and inland location, it has a prolonged winter. Three quarters of the country’s territory consist of grasslands, the remainder being either desert or mountainous. The rate of poverty is high, but this alone does not explain the presence of many donors. The strategic location of Mongolia, sandwiched between China and Russia, is another important factor. That Mongolia is a democracy with a good human rights record, that aid management functions reasonably well and that foreign consultants are well received by the Mongolians are other explanatory factors.

Keywords

Poverty Reduction Strategy Japanese Business Assistant Resident Foreign Consultant Cabinet Secretariat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Lkham Luvsanjamts and Marie Söderberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lkham Luvsanjamts
    • 1
  • Marie Söderberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Mongolian University of Science and TechnologyMongolia
  2. 2.European Institute of Japanese StudiesStockholm School of EconomicsSweden

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