Employers in the Low-Wage Labour Market: Is Their Role Important?

  • Harry J. Holzer

Abstract

According to the basic framework that economists almost universally use, employers constitute one half of the labour market; yet they have generally accounted for far less than one half of analyses, and especially the empirical work on labour markets. This is partly because the most popular and straightforward versions of economic theory suggest that, with full labour mobility and competitive markets, employers do not really matter very much in the long run (in terms of explaining the variance in wage and employment outcomes across workers); and partly because, until fairly recently, relatively little good data on employers has been available for testing hypotheses on them.

Keywords

Transportation Income Alan Flint Bluestone 

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Copyright information

© Harry J. Holzer 2005

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  • Harry J. Holzer

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