Staff Participation in the Public Services

  • David Farnham
  • Annie Hondeghem
  • Sylvia Horton

Abstract

The aims of this chapter are to provide an overview of the nature and scope of the main types of staff participation found in public services, to identify staff as key stakeholders in public management reform and to indicate the sorts of processes through which public officials can become involved in the reform process. This is done by drawing on the literature, comparative data and selective empirical evidence, provided by our contributors. This background informs the country studies in Chapters 4–15, where more determinate relationships between staff participation and the modernization agenda in central governments are examined in some detail.

Keywords

Europe Arena Defend Stake OECD 

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Copyright information

© David Farnham, Annie Hondeghem and Sylvia Horton 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Farnham
    • 1
    • 2
  • Annie Hondeghem
    • 3
  • Sylvia Horton
    • 4
  1. 1.University of PortsmouthEngland
  2. 2.Universities of Greenwich and East LondonEngland
  3. 3.Public Management InstituteCatholic University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  4. 4.School of Social, Historical and Literary StudiesUniversity of PortsmouthEngland

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