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New Zealand: Public Management Reform and the Partnership for Quality Agreement

  • Richard Shaw

Abstract

Between 1987 and the early 1990s a programme of reform rolled out across the New Zealand public sector which was among the most radical attempted anywhere in the world.’ The changes were comprehensive: the public financial management system was overhauled, the statutory basis of relations between ministers and senior officials was revised and responsibility for employment matters was decentralized to the heads of individual government departments.

Keywords

Public Service Industrial Relation Chief Executive Union Membership Public Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Richard Shaw 2005

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  • Richard Shaw

There are no affiliations available

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