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Historical Analysis and the Future of Democracy

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Abstract

Part of the significance of this study lies in the fact that there has not been any comparative work done on the state in Malaysia and Indonesia. Furthermore, the few works on the state in the two countries1 tend to focus on issues not directly related to the question of the origins of the post-colonial state. Democracy in post-colonial states cannot always be explained in terms of its emergence because it is a given, having been introduced from without. What needs explanation is how and why democracy persisted in some post-colonial states and gave way to authoritarianism in others, or alternatively, why democracies lasted as long as they did. This study has been an effort in this direction.

Keywords

Civil Society Historical Analysis Political Elite Authoritarian Regime Economic Dependency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Syed Farid Alatas 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyNational University of SingaporeSingapore

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