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New Technologies, Employment and Labour Markets in Developing Countries

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Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the impact of new technologies — especially, but not entirely, those that are related to microelectronics — on employment and labour markets in developing countries. Taking the form of a literature survey it looks at those impacts that have already occurred as well as effects that seem likely to occur in the future. Both sets of issues are addressed within an analytical framework that views the impact of technical change as the end result of a process which begins with the generation and proceeds via the diffusion of new technologies. The need for so broad an approach is shown to stem from the multiplicity of ways in which the generation and diffusion of new technologies influence each other and condition the ultimate impact of these technologies on employment and labour markets. Because many such mechanisms have not yet received much attention in the literature, there appears to be substantial scope for further research.

Keywords

Labour Market Direct Foreign Investment Working Paper Technological Change Technical Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Jeffrey James 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tilburg UniversityThe Netherlands

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